Not all toxic people are cruel and uncaring. Some of them love us dearly. Many of them have good intentions. Most are toxic to our being simply because their needs and way of existing in the world force us to compromise ourselves and our happiness. They aren’t inherently bad people, but they aren’t the right people for us. And as hard as it is, we have to let them go. Life is hard enough without being around people who bring you down, and as much as you care, you can’t destroy yourself for the sake of someone else. You have to make your wellbeing a priority. Whether that means breaking up with someone you care about, loving a family member from a distance, letting go of a friend, or removing yourself from a situation that feels painful — you have every right to leave and create a safer space for yourself.

Daniell Koepke (via jolinxo)

…my ex boyfriend

I love women,” coming from a man, almost always means “I love when women please me,” “I love to imagine fucking women,” “I love to jack off to women’s pornified bodies,” “I love women who don’t challenge me in a way that makes me uncomfortable,” or “I love the idea of women.

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.

Let us not forget their voices

I know girls who spill I’m sorry’s from their mouths like they pump blood
to their veins.
Sometimes, I am one.
I know girls who apologize for asking
to go to the bathroom in class,
who apologize for everything
because they feel like they are taking
up more than their fair share of space
on this planet.
Everything starts with an I’m sorry
and ends with one too,
constant bookends that we don’t
even notice anymore.
We delete her apology the way we
delete likes and ums from speech.
I know girls with ten times more apologies
than misdemeanors
and I wonder how often they hear
It’s okay.
You’re more than okay.

"I’m Sorry" by Claire Luisa  (via tanghuijuan)